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Boston Globe

After brief closure, iconic Harvard Square coffee house back in business

The reports of its demise were greatly exaggerated.  We’re talking about the Algiers Coffee House in Harvard Square.  The beloved café/restaurant on Brattle Street isn’t closing after all.  A few weeks after a Facebook post abruptly announced that it would cease operations  posthaste, there’s word that Algiers Coffee House is back in business, albeit under new management. 

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Cambridge Chronicle

Cambridge councilors decry Harvard Square kiosk process; call for longer timeframe

Cambridge City Councilors are objecting to a plan from city officials to speed along a process seeking new designs for the Out of Town News kiosk in Harvard Square. At their Oct. 31 meeting, the City Council voted unanimously to approve a policy order that urged the city to slow down the process, potentially making room for historic preservation efforts to advance.

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Cambridge Chronicle

Thousands line Cambridge streets for Springsteen book signing

A line of thousands wound its way from the front entrance of The COOP on Massachusetts Avenue down along Church Street, as loyal fans waited to meet Bruce Springsteen at his book signing in Harvard Square this afternoon. (Click here to see more photos.)  The Boss came to Cambridge for the last stop of his book-signing tour to take photos and sign copies of his new autobiography, “Born To Run,” released Sept. 27.

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Cambridge Chronicle

Play Me, I’m Yours: Pianos placed in public spaces

Forget about your iPod – now you can create your own tunes or play old favorite by visiting numerous locations throughout Boston and Cambridge where pianos have been set up for use by the public until Oct. 10.

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WBUR

Public Squares, Private Money: Considering Harvard Square’s Glittering, Empty Future

Is the entire idea of Harvard Square as we know it about to end? Or is the long, slow fade of street-level intellectual foment that once set it apart merely being accelerated?  Whether you consider the Square’s heyday long past or not, news that the chopping block has been primed for two iconic institutions in the heart of the Square is still cause for alarm. Out of Town News, an incomparable international newsstand housed by the city of Cambridge next to the MBTA Red Line entrance, faces an uncertain future.

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Cambridge Chronicle

Curious George turns 75; Harvard Square store hosts birthday bash

The famously curious monkey whose stories have entertained generations of children is turning 75 this month. In honor of his birthday, The World’s Only Curious George Store in Harvard Square threw a grand celebration this past Saturday.  While the Curious George brand is popular around the world, there is a special local connection to the books in Cambridge. According to Diana Nessralla, director of corporate accounts and community outreach for the store, Curious George’s creators resided in the city for a good portion of their lives.

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New York Times

36 Hours in Cambridge, Mass.

Founded in 1630, the venerable college town of Cambridge has long been one of the nation’s intellectual centers. Anchored to the banks of the Charles River by both Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the city blends its storied past and erudite character with a rich serving of arts and culture. Today, the stamp of gentrification on Harvard Square and the gleaming biotech development flanking M.I.T., a.k.a. “Genetown,” make it harder to tune into Cambridge’s legendary countercultural vibe of used bookstores and punk rockers. Still, the outward-looking citizens, known as Cantabrigians, keep finding ways to express their funky, geeky flair, be it via political protests, copious bike lanes or science-driven cuisine and mixology.